Whether it was caused by a cracked or broken piece of flooring, exposed electrical wiring, accumulated water or ice, or some other hazardous situation, an injury sustained due to unreasonably dangerous property conditions can often be grounds for civil litigation. However, if you are not intimately familiar with the unique rules and restrictions set by Florida premises liability law, your chances of a favorable outcome are likely very slim.

Guidance from a qualified Largo premises liability lawyer could dramatically boost your chances of resolving your case efficiently and obtaining the compensation you need. From the beginning to the end of your legal proceedings, your tenacious personal injury attorney could advocate for your rights, negotiate with court authorities and defense counsel on your behalf, and tirelessly pursue the best possible resolution to your unique lawsuit or settlement demand.

Recovering Compensation Within Filing Deadlines

A property owner or manager who performs substandard maintenance of their land may bear civil liability for every form of harm that a visitor suffers through an ensuing accident. This includes not just economic and non-economic damages, but also past and future losses relative to when you file suit. Common damages include:

  • Emergency medical expenses
  • Costs of future medical/rehabilitative care
  • Personal property damage
  • Lost work income and/or earning ability
  • Physical pain and suffering
  • Psychological trauma and/or lost enjoyment of life

Importantly, though, most people injured by someone else’s negligent conduct in Florida have a maximum of two years after their accident to begin filing suit. Anyone who fails to file their claim within this statutory period—or have a skilled Largo premises liability attorney do so for them—will almost always lose the right to recover for that particular accident.

Different Duties of Care for Different Landowners

Another reason premises liability claims can be difficult to litigate successfully is that state law does not hold property owners equally liable for all injuries that occur on their property.

Trespassers

For example, landowners in Florida usually have no duty whatsoever to protect trespassers from accidental harm, though they may be liable for injuries to trespassing minor children in some situations. They also cannot intentionally try to injure a trespasser by knowingly creating dangerous conditions.

Licensees

For lawful visitors, the duty of care the property owner owes depends on the visitor’s reason for being on their property. If the visitor is a “licensee” visiting for their own benefit, the property owner must provide advance warning of known hazards but is generally not liable for injuries caused by hazards they are not yet aware of.

Invitees

On the other hand, landowners owe “invitees”—people visiting for the property owner’s financial benefit—a greater duty of care. This requires not only advance warning of known hazards, but also regular inspection of their land so they are aware of new hazards and can address them promptly. A property liability lawyer in Largo could explain what duty a particular defendant might have had and what that might mean for your recovery options.

Contact a Largo Premises Liability Attorney for Help

Demanding fair financial recovery after being hurt on another person’s property can be challenging even if you have extremely strong evidence demonstrating their fault for your injuries. Either way, guidance from skilled legal counsel can be vital not just to maximize available compensation, but to get any compensation at all.

A knowledgeable Largo premises liability lawyer could provide support throughout your legal proceedings. Learn more by calling today.

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