Even if they are not directly involved in an accident someone has while on their property, landowners may still be held liable under certain circumstances for injuries caused by that accident. However, the exact circumstances that would make a property owner liable for a visitor’s injuries can vary significantly depending on why that visitor was on their land, and to some extent how much fault that visitor holds for causing their own injuries.

A conversation with a Riverview premises liability lawyer could provide vital clarification about whether your unique circumstances may constitute grounds for recovery through a civil lawsuit or settlement demand. Once retained, your seasoned personal injury attorney could provide dedicated legal support throughout every stage of your case, demanding full compensation on your behalf for all your compensable losses.

Recoverable Damages Through a Successful Claim

In broad terms, a property owner or manager may be held financially accountable for injuries suffered by a property visitor if they—the owner or manager—were legally “negligent” in some way. In this context, “negligence” entails violating a duty of care in such a way that it directly leads to an accident resulting in at least one injury necessitating professional medical care.

A person who can prove their accident would likely never have happened if a defendant landowner had not recklessly or carelessly breached their duty can demand restitution for every form of harm their injuries directly cause, including both past and future losses like:

  • Emergency medical bills
  • Costs of future care, including rehabilitative treatments, assistive medical devices, and prescription medications
  • Lost earning capacity and/or earnings
  • Personal property damage, if applicable
  • Physical pain from injuries
  • Emotional and psychological distress
  • Lost overall quality of life

A Riverview property liability attorney could go into more detail during a private initial meeting about what damages might be available given a particular set of circumstances.

Determining a Landowner’s “Duty of Care”

Importantly, property owners in Florida do not owe the same “duty” to every person who visits their property. Most notably, landowners have very little responsibility when it comes to trespassers, other than a general obligation to mark overt hazards as dangerous, post “no trespassing” signs, and refrain from intentionally creating hazardous conditions—for example, by setting traps.

If a visitor is a “licensee,” meaning someone visiting for their own purposes and not the landowner’s benefit, the landowner’s duty requires them to make sure that visitor has sufficient warning of all known hazards on the property. Property owners may not be liable for injuries to licensees caused by hazards they were not aware of as the property owner.

Finally, when it comes to “invitees” visiting for a landowner’s financial benefit, property owners must not only provide warning of known hazards but also inspect their property regularly for dangers they are not aware of yet. A premises liability lawyer in Riverview could offer further guidance about whether someone may or may not have grounds for litigation based on their circumstances.

Talk to a Riverview Premises Liability Attorney Today

Liability for accidents and injuries on private property can be difficult to piece together, especially for people without any experience with civil litigation. If a landowner’s misconduct led to you getting hurt, having professional legal guidance could be key not just to maximizing your financial recovery, but potentially to getting any restitution at all.

A Riverview premises liability lawyer could discuss your case and possible legal options in detail during a confidential consultation. Schedule yours by calling today.

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